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Spurtle  -  the traditional Scottish porridge stick


Spurtle

 

Cook your porridge like a true Scot.

The spurtle has a long history in Scotland where it was used to stir the oats as they softened slowly in the pot. Today's oatmeal doesn't take nearly as long to cook, but why not keep in touch with tradition and use a spurtle anyway?  And apart from cooking your morning bowl of oatmeal, it will find many other uses in your kitchen.

Your wooden spurtle won't scratch your pots

No need to worry about scratching pots or pans with cookware made from wood! And that's not all. Recent studies have found that wood contains chemicals that fight bacterial growth.

Your spurtle is easy to care for

Just wash your spurtle in warm soapy water and leave it to dry thoroughly.

If you wish, you may occasionally wipe your spurtle with a little mineral oil to renew the finish. I don't recommend using cooking oils as some types can go rancid.

Handcrafted from fine local hardwood

I handcraft these spurtles from hard maple and finish them with mineral oil. This contemporary design is about 13 inches long.

Buy a spurtle now

SPURTLE

$12.00 CDN

Each spurtle is accompanied by an information card about spurtles and porridge.

Spurtle being used to cook porridge

Spurtle vs Spoon

One of the questions I get asked a lot, is why use a spurtle rather than a wooden spoon. Well, I'm no expert, but the Porridge Lady says
"I use a Spurtle when making oatmeal Porridge. I find that the large surface area of a spoons head tends to drag through oatmeal. With a Spurtle I can almost whisk through the cooking Porridge which stops lumps from forming."

Reviews

Porridge and oatmeal and spurtles, oh my! - "Once you’ve used a spurtle for making your oatmeal, though, I can promise you that you’ll never go back to regular spoons"

Spurtles make for prize porridge - Chronicle Herald, October 30, 2011 - "My favourites are the 33-centimetre maple spurtles handcrafted at Seafoam Woodturning Studio near River John by owner and woodworker Derek Andrews."

Spurtle - "It is such a lovely, beautifully made tool and I am just thrilled with it! "

Holiday Maple Wood Oatmeal Spurtles? - "Seafoam Woodturning Studio makes about the most lovely oatmeal stirrers, called a spurtle on this side of the Atlantic."

Your Final Friday KISS - The Spurtle! -  If your appetite for spurtle-lore and all things oatmeal still isn't satisfied, check out The Tradition and Trivia of Scottish Porridge from Seafoam Woodturning.

More information about spurtles and porridge:

The Tradition and Trivia of spurtles and porridge.....
Oatmeal and Porridge.....
 

Related blog posts:

Spurtles aren't just for oatmeal
Kitchenware care
Another Satisfied Customer
Waste not, want not

Elsewhere:

Spot the spurtle
A spurtle it is - Well done to all those who identified the mystery object as a spurtle or porridge-stick.
Care & Usage Tips for Wooden Spoons - applies equally well to spurtles and some tips here I haven't tried myself.

 

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Copyright © Derek Andrews 2003-2011. Seafoam Woodturning Studio, Nova Scotia, Canada.